Premiere: Somebody’s Child Goes the “Distance” in a Euphoric Coming-of-Age Song

Dynamic and driving, Somebody’s Child’s exciting song “Distance” passionately recalls hopeless romance and the throes of youth with unrelenting rock euphoria.
Listen: “Distance” – Somebody’s Child


We could go the distance, I could hold this instance forever in my mind…

Certain special and defining moments stick with us long after their candles have burned out: From love and togetherness, to laughter and pure joy, to loss, isolation, and beyond, memory has a funny way of elevating and enshrining the big ticket items in our minds. For many of us, one such major highlight is our romantic naïveté – a subject Ireland’s Somebody’s Child dives into on his exciting new single. Dynamic and driving, “Distance” passionately recalls the throes of youth and hopeless romance with unrelenting indie rock euphoria.

Distance - Somebody’s Child

Distance – Somebody’s Child

I have tried to hold my breath,
Because I wanted you,
Because I wanted you,
I’m not sure of what can be said,
Except that I need you,
Except that I need you,

Atwood Magazine is proud to be premiering “Distance,” the third single from rising indie pop/rock act Somebody’s Child (independently out July 25, 2019). With sweeping dynamism and magnetic charisma, the Irish singer-songwriter paints a sweet guitar-laden landscape of connection and hope: A desire to see the relationship through and get the most out of every moment.

“When I first wrote ‘Distance’, it immediately brought me back to a time in my teenage years when I was a hopeless romantic,” Somebody’s Child tells Atwood Magazine. “I wanted the song to bring out those tiny memories that only I would remember because of their significance at the time: Little nuances that shape the person I am today. We all have memories of a first relationship and can relate to the power of emotion that it can bring. Similarly, most of us are victim to a first break-up. Distance to me brings out those ecstatic feelings of young love along with those of naïvety from one’s first heartbreak.”

It’s a nostalgic adventure into the innocence that we chase for the rest of our lives: A coming-of-age story that lies between the lines of expectation and reality.

The artist continues: “The lyrics are drawn from some of my personal experience but are quite relatable I imagine to others who have experienced something similar. My favourite line lies in the chorus: ‘I could show you what I know/ And you could show me what I don’t’. That to me embodies that feeling of fulfilment when you finally meet someone you’re completely comfortable with.”

Somebody’s Child © Jim Fuller

Somebody’s Child © Jim Fuller

And how we felt depressed,
You said just let it rest,
Try think of someone else
I said just give me more,
You can’t just open that door
Cause we could go the distance,
I could hold this instance,
Forever in my mind
And I could show you what I know,
And you could show me what I don’t,
I wanna live it with you.

Booming guitars open up to a rollicking field of pure energy that finds Somebody Child doing what he does best, and what we’ve already come to love in his music: Driving home a feeling with bombast and cheer. In featuring his previous single “Toes” in our weekly roundupAtwood writer Luke Pettican wrote, ““Toes” features magnificently delicate songwriting which cultivates an almost indescribable emotional intimacy.” Pettican later lauded Somebody’s Child’s “distinct spirited musical style and thought-provoking, observant lyricism” in our “Toes” video premiere published later that same month.

Whereas his career has only just begun, Somebody’s Child certainly affirms this energetic element that fills his music with lively delights: “[‘Distance’] was originally written an acoustic guitar, but on electric guitar it just sounds full of energy, which suits the intensity of what some of us associate with an early relationship,” the artist reflects. “The rest of the sound is more or less based around this philosophy too, with powerful drums, driving bass, and accompanying guitar parts that I tried to interweave with the main vocal melody.”

What I love about Distance is how it addresses a past-life through a nostalgic yet grateful lens while retaining that feel-good quality.

Somebody’s Child © Jim Fuller

Somebody’s Child © Jim Fuller

Can we find a common ground,
Cause I’ve been messed around,
Oh I’ve been messed around,
You’ll be fine and I’ll be lost,
That’s just what happens to us,
Who try too hard to find
the love that we have left behind.

With his name and identity still unknown to the greater populace, Somebody’s Child forces us to focus squarely on his music and messaging: The artist isn’t shy about what his songs mean to him, but he’s also quick to assert that they’re not about his experience alone, but rather vessels through which we may all connect to something outside of our everyday – something that’s beyond the normal push and pull of life.

“Distance” is a resounding commemoration of young love: Of butterflies in the stomach and those small, important moments – each of which felt like a landslide at the time. In a sense, this song is a reminder that those moments remain special today; that we can still have a kiss feel, at times, like your first kiss; that the magic is far from dead, but rather, still very much alive.

Go the “Distance” exclusively with Atwood Magazine, and be sure to keep Somebody’s Child on your radar!

Cause we could go the distance,
I could hold this instance,
Forever in my mind,
And I could show you what I know,
And you could show me what I don’t,
I wanna live it with you.

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:: stream/purchase “Distance” here ::
Listen: “Distance” – Somebody’s Child

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Distance - Somebody’s Child

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📸 © Jim Fuller
art © Barra Carlin

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Mitch Mosk

Mitch is the Editor-in-Chief of Atwood Magazine and a 2014 graduate from Tufts University, where he pursued his passions of music and psychology. He currently works at Universal Music Group in New York City. In his off hours, Mitch may be found songwriting, wandering about one of New York's many neighborhoods, or writing an article on your next favorite artist for Atwood. Mitch's words of wisdom to fellow musicians and music lovers are thus: Keep your eyes open and never stop exploring. No matter where you go, what you do or who you are with, you can always learn something new and inspire something amazing. Say hi here: mitch[at]atwoodmagazine[dot]com