Review: Stonefield’s Unapologetic Psych-Rock Journey ‘Far From Earth’

Stonefield
Australia psych-rock sister band Stonefield share their favorite songs off 2018’s Far From Home, a heavy and unapologetically impassioned injection of relentless energy and guitar-driven grace.
for fans of The Black Keys, King Gizzard, DZ Deathrays
Stream: ‘Far From Earth’ – Stonefield




Far From Earth - Stonefield

Far From Earth – Stonefield

Some music only gets better with age: Like a fine wine, the more you sit with it, the deeper you dive into its folds. Such is the case with Far From Home, the third album from Australian psych-rock quartet Stonefield. Released April 13, 2018 via Flightless Records / Inertia Music, Far From Home is a heavy, unapologetically impassioned injection of relentless energy and guitar-driven grace.

Influenced heavily by the psychedelic and rock legends of the 1970s, Stonefield is the four-piece of sisters Amy Findlay (lead vocals and drums), Sarah Findlay (keys and backing vocals), Holly Findlay (bass and backing vocals), and Hannah Findlay (guitar and backing vocals). While they have been actively releasing music in some form since the start of the decade, they rose to local prominence with their 2017 sophomore album As Above, So Below, which peaked at #19 on the Australian Albums charts. This was followed by Far From Earth in 2018, and most recently 2019’s fourth album, Bent.

While Bent puts Stonefield’s sonic growth and maturing musicality on full display, this could never have happened without the foundation they found in Far From Earth,  a ten-song collection of ruthless overdrive sprinkled with creative riffs, pulsing melodies, the bright breaths of freedom and the shivering burden of gloom. Opener “Delusion” paints an ominous, dark scene with its heavy beat, hard-hitting wash of guitars. The band jettison into space with the song “Far From Earth,” followed by the explosive blues-rock jam “In the Eve.” Influences from Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin, to Rush and The Rolling Stones can be heard in the band’s expressive melodies and untiring beats.

For the rock fan looking for heavy 21st century rock, look no further than Stonefield.



“Visions” is a rhythmic hypnosis; “Broken Stone” is a rollicking fantasy; “Sleepyhead” is a mystic journey. However one listens to Far From Earth, heavy vibes and an outpouring of raw, unabridged hard rock are guaranteed to abound. Closing the album on a delightful high note in “Celestial Space,” Stonefield ensure our timely return, welcoming us to come back anytime for more dark, sweeping explorations of psych-rock expression.

Atwood Magazine spoke to Stonefield’s four Findlay sisters about their favorite songs on Far From Earth. Dive into the band’s personal favorites below, and be sure to stream Far From Earth and 2019’s followup Bent, both of which deliver a captivating experience!

Stream: ‘Far From Earth’ – Stonefield



:: Inside Far From Home ::

Far From Earth - Stonefield

— —

Amy Findlay

One of my favourite tracks off the record would have to be “Delusion.” I like that it’s not a typical song structure and a bit more of a jam. When we recorded the song it felt more like we were creating a spacey atmosphere, than a song.


Hannah Findlay

My favourite song on the record is “In the Eve.”I love the groove that it has, and that there’s a lot of space and room to breathe.


Sarah Findlay

My fav song off FFE is “Visions.” It has a groovy beat, almost a bit disco like. It’s one of our favorites to play live.


Holly Findlay

“Sleepyhead” is one of my favorite tracks from Far From Earth. When we were writing this song, it came together very quickly and nicely. I love the vocal melodies, and I also love the line, “sleepy heads run the world.”



— —

:: stream/purchase Far From Earth here ::

— — — —

Far From Earth - Stonefield

Connect to Stonefield on
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram
Discover new music on Atwood Magazine
📸 © 2019

:: Stream Stonefield ::



Mitch Mosk

Mitch is the Editor-in-Chief of Atwood Magazine and a 2014 graduate from Tufts University, where he pursued his passions of music and psychology. He currently works at Universal Music Group in New York City. In his off hours, Mitch may be found songwriting, wandering about one of New York's many neighborhoods, or writing an article on your next favorite artist for Atwood. Mitch's words of wisdom to fellow musicians and music lovers are thus: Keep your eyes open and never stop exploring. No matter where you go, what you do or who you are with, you can always learn something new and inspire something amazing. Say hi here: mitch[at]atwoodmagazine[dot]com