Surrendering To The Sound: A Slow Club Review

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Think of an eighties movie, based on the geeky girl who will never have a chance with the hunky guy—until at the very end when an unexpected twist of events sends him her way and something special is ignited between them. As they share a slow dance  (prom king and queen, of course), he admits she has been the one for him all along as they dance to that one special song. Credits roll out, and there it is, the long awaited happily-ever-after. In the context of Slow Club’s new album, Complete Surrender,”‘Number One”  would be playing when they break up for a couple of scenes. “Tears of Joy” would play for the end of dance slow song, and so on. Most track titles provide quite a clear idea of which scene the song would fit, and the album’s name itself evokes images of unbridled love between the prom king and queen.

The more I listened to this album the more I realized that it also emphasizes the evolution of the band. Rebecca Taylor and Charles Watson remain faithful to their core sound, but Complete Surrender sees a more grown up, swing version of their music, as opposed to the upbeat and innocent tones heard on their debut album Yeah So. If 2009 was the childhood stage, 2014 brings us the young adult version, with a more mature and skillfully honed sound.  Chilled out and feel good, this is one album ideal for relaxing, (or end of prom dancing).

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I'm 15, into indie folk music and am a music writer for Atwood. I collect things like old books, crystals and socks, and I want to travel all over the world.