Premiere: Twilight Driving Inject Passion & Place into Infectious Anthem “Dangerous”

Twilight Driving © Sam Shaw
Twilight Driving embrace city life’s tumult and buzz in their passionate song “Dangerous,” an ambient indie pop outpouring.
for fans of A Silent Film, The Killers

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Life is crazy: If there’s one basic fact that becomes painfully obvious to everyone as they transition into adulthood, it is that the world is a constant mess of big events and daily chores, changes and news, white noise and welcome sounds. The older you get, or so I’m told, the better you become at handling priorities and cancelling out the minutiae. Nevertheless, that doesn’t stop the younger years in a city from feeling like one long, intense rush. Twilight Driving embrace city life’s tumult and buzz in their passionate song “Dangerous,” an ambient indie pop outpouring with a fiery glow.

Iʼm in love with the city
Iʼm in love with tonight
With the neon buzz of the club
In the half light there is no pride
In these city lights, at night
In these city lights
Itʼs just dangerous
Stream: “Dangerous” – Twilight Driving

Atwood Magazine is proud to be premiering “Dangerous,” the fourth single from indie pop/rock band Twilight Driving. The Brighton-based four-piece of George Gleeson, Will Mavin, Aidan Chadwick, and Danny Lawrence have quickly been making a name for themselves over the past year, debuting in September 2017 with the Killers-esque “Soft & Pink.” The group continued to establish their sound and style this year with the aching Americana-inspired ballad “When Love Goes Wrong,” and in July made their first big splash with the propulsive power-anthem “Between the Sheets,” a catchy rocker packing as much energy as it does emotion.

Dangerous - Twilight Driving

Dangerous – Twilight Driving

Having earned acclaim from Clash for their last single, Twilight Driving are looking to end this year on a high note with “Dangerous,” an intimate and expansive burst of passion.

Cut loose from the noose
Of responsibility
I found my self lost in the lanes
Oh Give it up, just give it up
Thereʼs only so much pain
You can ask someone you love to take
And there is no pride
In these city lights

Soft, muted verses give way to a simple, yet explosive and effective chorus: “It’s dangerous,” sings vocalist and guitarist George Gleeson, channeling the likes of Brandon Flowers and A Silent Film’s Robert Stevenson as he unburdens himself of adulthood’s unyielding ups and downs, excitement and stress.

At the end of it all, “Dangerous” isn’t a warning or a lament; it’s more like a shock to the senses, the natural backlash to being overwhelmed by life itself. “Living in Brighton has always had a big influence on the things we write about,” the band tells Atwood Magazine. “It’s such a vibrant and energetic place, you’re always going out late and constantly meeting new people with different outlooks. It’s sometimes hard to keep up with that and not lose yourself to it. We wanted to capture all of the highs and lows of living in a city into one song.”

In these city lights
Itʼs just Dangerous

“[It’s] about growing up and living in a city, when everything is constantly changing around you. Friends move away, relationships change and the impact that has on your health. It’s that experience of moving from your teens and into your twenties, that everyone goes through.”

Twilight Driving © Sam Shaw

Twilight Driving © Sam Shaw

We wanted to capture all of the highs and lows of living in a city into one song.

I remember thinking about my purpose and existence throughout my younger years. Questions of identity and thoughts about my life’s meaning haunted me, following me around and lurking in my subconscious for weeks on end. Still, my job at the time was to live out my youth: To learn and be curious; to play and goof around with friends; to ask an endless amount of questions and absorb all that I could of the world around me. The actuality of my “place” in this semi-ordered chaos felt distant, and I could tuck away those thoughts if I tried hard enough.

Nowadays I can still distract myself, but those questions are no longer far away or hypothetical. Understanding my existence is an inescapable fact of my daily being; it is an endeavor I am challenged with, and must confront daily. The difference between my current and former selves is that now, I undertake this immense task with a degree of excitement and pride. I am no longer afraid of these big, looming questions of being. Every day is another opportunity for discovery as I look for answers, carve out my path, and live.

Through “Dangerous,” Twilight Driving have captured the magnitude and scale of this everpresent reality. Immersed in both the convoluted daily grind as well as the grandiose bigger picture, they pour emotion and energy into a much-needed, impassioned release. We all need an anchor, or a few, as we ride the tide of everyday existence; with “Dangerous,” the Brighton band have thrown us a shining safety vest ready to carry that weight.

And with this song, Twilight Driving conclude an exciting, transcendent year. The future is bright as they ascend out of Brighton; we can’t wait to hear where they go next. Stream “Dangerous” exclusively on Atwood Magazine.

Stream: “Dangerous” – Twilight Driving

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Dangerous - Twilight Driving

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Mitch Mosk

Mitch is the Editor-in-Chief of Atwood Magazine and a 2014 graduate from Tufts University, where he pursued his passions of music and psychology. He currently works at Universal Music Group in New York City. In his off hours, Mitch may be found songwriting, wandering about one of New York's many neighborhoods, or writing an article on your next favorite artist for Atwood. Mitch's words of wisdom to fellow musicians and music lovers are thus: Keep your eyes open and never stop exploring. No matter where you go, what you do or who you are with, you can always learn something new and inspire something amazing. Say hi here: mitch[at]atwoodmagazine[dot]com