Premiere: Worthitpurchase Deal with the Pain of Being Nostalgic on Debut “Dizzy Age”

Worthitpurchase © Noah Beaty
San Francisco duo Worthitpurchase combine a lo-fi atmosphere, catchy melodies, and bells for a satisfying offering on debut single “Dizzy Age.”
Stream: “Dizzy Age” – Worthitpurchase




Worthitpurchase are a San Francisco duo who met, of all places, in a SoundCloud commenting section in 2015 when one future bandmate, Omar Akrouche, covered the work of their other future bandmate, Nicole Rowe. Since that time, the pair released several collections of music under the name Glaçon Garçon before becoming Worthitpurchase.

Now, the duo is gearing up for the debut of their new project. As the band themselves would describe it, “‘Dizzy Age’ is about feeling less and less balanced as you grow up and realizing how little you know as you learn more about the world. Experiences pass by in a whim, leaving you nauseous and longing for the past.” Regardless of whether or not Worthitpurchase’s “Dizzy Age” is a reflection of life from within the thunderdome that is 2020, or is just merely a cosmic coincidence, it is no doubt a fitting title for a fitting song.

Atwood Magazine is proud to premiere “Dizzy Age,” the newest single from Worthitpurchase.

Dizzy Age - Worthitpurchase

Dizzy Age – Worthitpurchase

It’s a one way train speeding through all the years
I wanna get off I just wanna disappear
Are we even near?
But I won’t go back
‘cause I can’t get back

While time and one’s feelings of nostalgia for it are nothing new to write or sing about about, the group observes this dilemma with a bit more creativity and a bit less artistic melodrama. What makes the group’s approach all the more interesting is the discernible distance between what vocalist, Rowe, is singing and what they are implying. Undoubtedly, time is both a speeding train and a fueled-up rocket, but these metaphors are delivered with both a candid and certain detached acceptance that speaks volumes louder than some overproduced pop tune trying to sing the same song.

The smallest feeling fuels a rocket to space
I can’t stop thinking and I hate how things change
I’m trying to find a way
but I won’t go back
‘cause I can’t get back
Worthitpurchase © Noah Beaty

Worthitpurchase © Noah Beaty

In contrast to Rowe’s matter-of-fact lyricisms, the track itself is composed of an array of instruments and sounds that give the song a subtle, yet classifiably dizzying vibe. The song opens with repetitive guitar strums before a wash of white noise fills the background, cymbal hits accent and decay every few bars, and a solitary drum constantly beats underneath it all. As the song reaches what could be considered a chorus, Rowe’s voice is aided by harmonized background vocalizations and a choir of bells, to use such a turn of phrase. Given the layers that are stacked throughout the song, the end result is an intimate mix of shoegaze, lo-fi, and bedroom pop, a combination reminiscent of Yo La Tengo or The Radio Dept.

“Dizzy Age” is a promising offering from a duo who have already proven themselves quite compatible.

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Stream: “Dizzy Age” – Worthitpurchase

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Dizzy Age - Worthitpurchase

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📸 © Noah Beaty

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Nick Matthopoulos is a recent MA grad from DePaul University located in the city of Chicago. Though he studied and majored in English Literature, writing of any kind has always been a passion of his. When he is not serving coffee or teaching a music lesson, he can be found either writing, trying to improve his Lino carving skills, or working on the next Fieldmates song; a band he both plays guitar for and poorly sings with. He is a fan of jogging in bad weather, nice socks, and good pens.