Premiere: LA’s BEGINNERS Seek Connections, but “Trust No One”

At its core, BEGINNERS’ “Trust No One” discusses our need for human connection, no matter how detrimental that connection may be for us.

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Keep your friends close; keep your enemies closer. Most humans are inherently trusting of others, opening their hearts and forming bonds with others who, at surface level, seem inconspicuous enough. As many have often learned, however, this blind trust can soon backfire, leaving a void that becomes difficult to fill. On their latest single “Trust No One,” the video for which Atwood Magazine is premiering today, LA-based dark-pop outfit BEGINNERS further explore this ideal.

Trust No One - BEGINNERS

Trust No One – BEGINNERS

“Trust No One” delineates feeling betrayed by those we love most, explicating how one can ultimately pay the price for this disloyalty. “‘Trust No One’ is a reflection on how the most dangerous enemies are the people we love and let into our home,” BEGINNERS state. “A sort of friendly fire scenario; even when the ‘bad guy’ is you.”

Take notice,
There’s a thousand thorns
in my bed of roses
Pay for it,
‘Cuz the ones we love
are the ones who hurt us

The song’s first verse asks who could potentially be the culprit of deceit, and to make sure that one always remains vigilant in saving oneself before it’s too late. It asks to think critically about those we care about, and if they truly have our best interest at heart. Why do we allow ourselves to feel so attached to a person or persons who may just ultimately cause pain?

BEGINNERS © 2020

BEGINNERS © 2020



…Don’t move to fast, they’re on your back
Who loves, who lies, who’s waiting
Don’t let your head fill with regret
Who offers you salvation?

“Trust No One” then goes on to acknowledge the dysfunction that comes along with these unhealthy relationships, asking to “dive in headfirst” and to be the “last temptation.” The song illustrates the flagellant side of humanity and enduring negative relationships, and how easy it can become to get caught up in this negativity. “[The song] looks into the sadomasochistic nature of unhealthy relationships,” BEGINNERS explain. “Desperately wanting them to solve your problems and fill an emptiness, when in fact they’re draining you dry.”

Pleasure and pain
Make me your liberation
Dive in headfirst, your wanderlust
I’ll be your last temptation



The accompanying video for the song feels like a nightmarish visual straight out of Willy Wonka’s chocolate river tunnel, in all of the best possible ways.

BEGINNERS’ video does an excellent job driving home the gravity of the song’s point, incorporating darker themes to help elucidate deeper meaning. From a massive boa constrictor, to horns, to multiple eyes, to wearing a heart on the outside of the chest – an apt visual idiom that ostensibly best suits the song’s overall message – the video for “Trust No One” perfectly supplements everything that BEGINNERS are trying to say.

At its core, “Trust No One” discusses our need for human connection, no matter how detrimental that connection may be for us. “Trust No One” pointedly examines humanness and its flaws without being overtly accusatory; rather, it merely asks that we more closely watch out for the snakes in the grass; the Brutus to our Caesar. We are always more willing to trust the ones we love with blind ambition, seldom considering the possibility that it could ever be all for naught. “Trust No One” simply asks that you protect your heart; it is the most valuable that asset you possess.

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Watch: “Trust No One” – BEGINNERS



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📸 © 2020

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Maggie McHale

Maggie is a writer for Atwood Magazine, currently living in Philadelphia. She also works as a music manager and cultural liaison via her management company, PBG MGMT. She is heavily involved in the arts and music scene in the City of Brotherly Love, working previously for as a digital marketer for Fame House, a Universal Music Group subsidiary, and as a staff writer for JUMP Magazine. A self-proclaimed “hug enthusiast” and dog lover, Maggie also enjoys fashion, travel, the paranormal, and drinking way too much coffee.