Today’s Song: HUNTAR’s “Blindspot” Fights for Clarity

HUNTAR 2016

It is a tale that has been told time and time again: A relationship has soured, and somebody is left heartbroken. It is easy to relate this tale again and again because it is so accessible to everyone; in some way or another, we have all been hurt from love. Within this recurring theme, variants often arise — of course, no two love stories are ever truly the same. So, within songwriting and song making, musicians can easily find liberties that they can easily take to make something all their own.

Enter “Blindspot,” 21-year-old London-based crooner HUNTAR’s most recent single. It tells this age-old story, but brings with it an invigorating sound that even the most casual of listeners can enjoy. “Blindspot,” released on July 21st, is an impassioned entreaty that proves HUNTAR to be a powerful tour de force in the indie electro-pop world.

Listen: Blindspot – HUNTAR

Blindspot - HUNTAR (Glassnote Records)

Blindspot – HUNTAR (Glassnote Records)

 

“Don’t try to decide my heart.” So begins the pleading hymn of “Blindspot,” as HUNTAR copes with a love gone cold. “Blindspot” tells HUNTAR’s side of the relationship, as he navigates through the aftermath of the break up. It is fervently exclaiming the true hurt that he is feeling, and continues to try and achieve closure. The track seethes with painful acknowledgements, as the chorus sings:

You just left me in your blind spot
Drive off, tell me I’m your everything
Know I didn’t mean a thing.
Don’t you tell me that our times up
My love hit you like a bullet train
Now you want it back again.

HUNTAR floats on, admitting that he waited, and waited, and waited some more, but it was all for naught. He was hoping and hanging on for something better — but to no avail. There is no hope for this lost love. The relationship is gone forever, despite apparently numerous attempts to salvage it.

The track’s reverberating instrumentals, overlaid with HUNTAR’s heady vocal prowess, further prove “Blindspot” to be an alternative electro-pop heavyweight. “Blindspot” is a potent acknowledgment of what hurts the most, and HUNTAR makes it accessible. It fights for clarity, while simultaneously grappling with itself.

HUNTAR

HUNTAR (Source: Facebook)

HUNTAR himself is still relatively new within the music scene; only first releasing his debut EP in late 2014. His previous two singles, 4AM and SK1N, have racked up a combined five million listens altogether, and his recent signing to the U.S.-based label Glassnote Records prove that he is to be taken very seriously. “Blindspot” is an amalgamation of HUNTAR’s previous endeavors, blending together his hearty vocals and quixotic beats, and only further proves his worth within his respective scene.

“Blindspot” argues the inevitable aftermath when one feels slighted in a relationship. They ultimately begin to question where things went wrong, and haplessly seek out resolution. The helplessness, the fragility, the undeniable feeling of loss; all of these things are palpable. HUNTAR and “Blindspot” manage to acutely typify this ruthless void.

The track is a redundant orison that bites to the core, and manages to inherently epitomize the ubiquity of the emotions felt post-break up. With mesmerizing and powerful vocals akin to those of Ed Sheeran, HUNTAR enraptures listeners with his exciting sound, and through his lyricism finds points to which we can all relate. “Blindspot” is an impressive electro-pop paragon, simultaneously transcending its genre while wholly maintaining a notable pervasiveness. Though a relationship may have soured, one thing still remains: the ability to come out with a definitively remarkable break-up track.

Connect with HUNTAR on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram
Discover more new music on Atwood’s Picks

Blindspot – HUNTAR

Don’t, try to decide my heart
Don’t, say we’re the same we’re not
Don’t, explain there’s a change in us
Don’t come back, when you say that you’ve had enough.

You just left me in your blind spot
Drive off, tell me I’m your everything
Know I didn’t mean a thing.
Don’t you tell me that our times up
My love hit you like a bullet train
Now you want it back again.

I’ve been overthinking;
I was hoping and hanging on for us.
‘Cause you left me like a spirit
Just a ghost of you to haunt me through the dust.

Wait, all that I did was wait
Wait, and dreamed that you’d say my name
Wait, but it only caused me pain.
And when I wait, no I still didn’t see your face.

You just left me in your blind spot
Drive off, tell me I’m your everything
Know I didn’t mean a thing.
Don’t you tell me that our times up
My love hit you like a bullet train
Now you want it back again.

I’ve been overthinking;
I was hoping and hanging on for us.
‘Cause you left me like a spirit
Just a ghost of you to haunt me through the dust.

I’ve been overthinking;
I was hoping and hanging on for us.
‘Cause you left me like a spirit
Just a ghost of you to haunt me through the dust.

I’ve been overthinking;
I was hoping and hanging on for us.
‘Cause you left me like a spirit
Just a ghost of you to haunt me through the dust.

I’ve been overthinking;
I was hoping and hanging on for us.
‘Cause you left me like a spirit
Just a ghost of you to haunt me through the dust.

Maggie McHale

Maggie is the Chief Music Director for Atwood Magazine, currently living in Philadelphia. She also works as a Digital Marketer for Fame House, a Philly-based Universal Music Group subsidiary. She is heavily involved in the arts and music scene in the City of Brotherly Love, often enjoying (and even preferring) going to concerts and museums alone; just generally loving and exploring the city that she calls home. A self-proclaimed “hug enthusiast” and dog lover, Maggie also enjoys fashion, travel, the paranormal, and drinking way too much coffee. In addition to writing for Atwood, she freelances and contributes to JUMP Magazine. (Fun fact-She also once slow-danced with Boyz II Men in Las Vegas.)