Today’s Song: COIN Let It All Out with Their Latest Sonic Masterpiece

COIN are at their most personal with “Let It All Out (10:05),” a song that is a sonic departure while still offering fans something familiar to fall in love with.
 follow our Today’s Song(s) playlist
Listen: “Let It All Out (10:05)” – COIN




Several days prior to the release of indie-pop group COIN’s most recent single, “Let It All Out (10:05),” frontman Chase Lawrence tweeted something that signaled to fans they were in for a treat: “Some days, I feel like I was born to write this song.” The track, which is from the band’s upcoming album Dreamworld set to drop in January 2020, revealed itself to be unlike anything the group has ever tackled before. Otherworldly, soulful, and clearly laden with sentimentality, “Let It All Out (10:05)” is a sonic masterpiece that unveils yet another side of COIN.

COIN – Let It All Out

An unsigned note on the group’s Twitter account explained the process of making the song. “We produced every bit in my bedroom, our friend’s basement & even recorded my childhood church choir in the sanctuary. The vocals are one take in front of the speakers, and the mic cable cuts out in the last verse. I like to think it happened for a reason,” the note reads. The meaning of the track is also explained in this note, which touches on why the group picked the number 10:05, how it started, and what it has meant to the group. “For some reason, I’ve seen this number my entire life — on the microwave, my change at restaurants, my estimated arrival time, etc.,” it reads. “I like to believe it’s a signal to take a second to listen to your heart beating & your blood pumping. In prosperity & disaster, in light & darkness, it’s all here, right in front of you.”

When you love something, but you had enough
When you hold someone, but you’re losing touch
You’re rubbing salt deep in the cut
Oh, I-I-I
Every move you make is apocalypse
And you feel your fate at your fingertips
Oh, this is my last line defense
Oh, I-I-I

The first verse is understated, which allows for the track to start small and open up later. Lawrence sings, “When you love something, but you had enough // When you hold someone, but you’re losing touch // You’re rubbing salt deep in the cut // Oh, I-I-I.” These lyrics demonstrate a disconnect for Lawrence. The idea of needing a break and falling short emerges, which Lawrence compares to “rubbing salt deep in the cut.” The next few lyrics are still quiet, and Lawrence adds, “Every move you make is apocalypse // And you feel your fate at your fingertips // Oh, this is my last line defense, Oh, I-I-I.” Here, he reveals the extent of his dismay and sense of doom. The chorus opens the song up a bit more, as Lawrence sings, “Let it all out (Oh, oh) // Let it all out (Oh, oh) // Let it all out.” The repeat of “Let it all out” is the first instance any sensation of hope enters the song.



Let it all out
(Oh, oh)
Let it all out
(Oh, oh)
Let it all out

The next verse shows Lawrence reverting to his formerly saddened mindset. He sings, “I’m a thousand miles from my front door // And I can’t recall what I came here for // My skin is thick, but I can’t take much more // Oh, I-I-I.” The statement about being a thousand miles from his front door may refer to Lawrence’s geographical location when “Let It All Out (10:05)” started. The note posted said that the song “…began on a stage October 5, 2018, in Manila, Philippines. Every single emotion hit me at once. My mind was racing, but my feet wouldn’t move an inch. I felt as if I was sinking.”

COIN © Paige Kindlick

COIN © Paige Kindlick

I’m a thousand miles from my front door
And I can’t recall what I came here for
My skin is thick, but I can’t take much more
Oh, I-I-I

After the second choir, the song begins to sound transcendent. There’s a guitar lead-in, and then the post-chorus echoes. Moments after, the bridge arrives and the song is at its fullest and most glorious. A choir steps in, singing, “Oh I’ve been waitin’ // For something to change, but I can’t escape this // Waterfall of doubt // All my blood, sweat, and tears // for twenty-some years // All bottled up and broken // Let it all out.” The lyrics here are no longer timid or demure as they originally began. The choir makes the sound full and pulls the listener right into COIN’s world. Hope feels possible, unlike at the beginning of the song, and the entire track feels light and airy.



Oh, I’ve been waitin’
For something to change, but
I can’t escape this
Waterfall of doubt
All my blood, sweat, and tears
For twenty-some years
All bottled up and broken
Let it all out

The outro is arguably the most spiritual moment in the song. Lawrence muses, “Jesus, are you listenin’?” As he sings this lyric, the mic cable cuts out. The note the band posted revealed that the group did take this as some sort of a sign, stating, “I like to think it happened for a reason.” When a fan commented about it on Twitter and mentioned that they weren’t sure if it was supposed to be a religious song, Lawrence replied, “It’s whatever you want it to be. It has meant absolutely anything & everything to me for the past year.” Lawrence continues, singing, “If you have a plan, can you fill me in? // Oh, Jesus if you’re listening // I-I-I-I.” The song ends on a quieter note, and the listener gets a sense that they’re overhearing Lawrence’s inner dialogue.

Jesus, are you listenin’?
If you have a plan, can you fill me in?
Oh, Jesus if you’re listening
I-I-I-I

“Let It All Out (10:05)” isn’t COIN’s most uptempo song, nor is it their most sonically blaring. Lawrence’s voice for the entirety of the song is controlled and lowkey; he doesn’t exert all his vocal power. Instead, he exerts something very different: The will to accept his feelings, let it go, and let life do what it will.

Listen: “Let I All Out (10:05)” – COIN



— — — —

Connect with COIN on
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram
Discover new music on Atwood Magazine
📸 © David O'Donohue

:: Today’s Song(s) ::

 follow our daily playlist on Spotify



A “Simple Romance”: Zooming in on the Right Now with COIN

:: INTERVIEW ::

Special, Unique, and Dynamic: A Conversation with COIN

:: INTERVIEW ::



COIN Battle for Song of the Summer with “Feeling”

:: THIS JUST IN ::

Chasing Indie Pop Perfection with COIN

:: INTERVIEW ::

:: Stream COIN ::


Avatar

Madison Zoey Vettorino is a Journalism student at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She is passionate about both the written word and music because she believes they have something incredible in common: the capability to bring people together.