Today’s Song: Saytr Play’s Invigorating Anthem for the Youth, the Planet, and Our “Future”

Saytr Play
Manchester-based rock band Saytr Play have released “Future,” an anthem of the youth filled with concerns and fear about the uncertain.
 follow our Today’s Song(s) playlist

Atwood Magazine Today's Songs logo

Stream: “Future” – Saytr Play




Two months ago, we celebrated the beginning of a new decade, ready to relive the spirit of the roaring twenties in the last century. Parties all around the globe, full of glitter, booze and laughter; everyone has seemed to be happy and excited, welcoming the new decade with a firework of endorphins. But as we all know, nothing is what it seems like nowadays, not even the most Gatsby-like New Year’s Eve celebration. Last year, the world finally woke up from its naïve vision that the way we treat the planet will have no consequences. After global movements like skipping school to make people aware of the real impact of climate change, people and politicians have realised how serious the situations are, especially for the younger generation. Heated political situations or reckless human behaviour does not make the future look very bright for them.

Future - Saytr Play

Future – Saytr Play

Exactly this situation and the feeling of simply feeling sorry about all this is musically captured in the song “Future,” by Saytr Play, a rock band born in the rainy weather of Manchester, a major city in the North of England. In the past, many successful British bands such as Oasis, The Smiths, and Joy Division came out of this northern hub for musical creativity. Nowadays, the city still retains a very emerging music scene, especially for new bands such as Saytr Play. The five-piece are already well-known in the local music scene, especially for their captivating live shows full of energy and passion. Their new song “Future” is an anthem for the future generation, with a chorus that will stick in your ear, waiting to be sung out.

The track starts with a solo a capella intro by lead singer Fred Farrell, singing the chorus of the song in a very David Bowie-like style:

If this is what it feels like
to be the future
I feel so sorry for the youth
Running around
as the bombs hit the ground
Saytr Play

Saytr Play

The solo, without any instrumental support, makes the chorus seem very deep and rooted into the ground. The listener gets the message of the song immediately – it is a musical apology for the younger and upcoming generation, apologizing for what circumstances we have caused for them with our behaviour. After this captivating solo, the instrumentals commence: A mix of indie beats with clear pop influences finds its way into our ears. The melody is very strong, supporting the deep lyrics of the track. The first verse of the song starts with using the term of forgotten people, a metaphor to describe the young people. The people and their future that we seemed to forget along the way, whilst we were busy using up resources for our own benefit: 

Forgotten people, gather round
there asking questions
will we be found.
Forgotten people, walk the street
so peacefully

This generation has no idea why we acted exactly in that way, as the line “walk in the street” so peacefully indicates. They have done nothing wrong; the reckless behaviour is not justified in any way. Saytr Play try to reveal that we live currently in a bubble, hiding from the truth, busy getting lost in our own invented fiction of reality:

as I grow old
and live my life as fiction

Moreover, the band constantly refer to the damages we have made as bombs on the ground, reminding listeners of the visible damages of war. The way that humans fight or what pain they cause for future generations has massively changed in recent of decades. Back in the day, houses were burnt down or bombs were visible on the ground. Nowadays, you can simply feel it; the running out of earthly resources and the worrying change of the climate.

The song ends as it began, with the anthem-like chorus. Lyrics and melody are merging together and start to fade away, leaving the listener in a state of unconsciousness, giving the opportunity to think about their behaviour toward our youth.

Saytr Play

Saytr Play

Lead singer Fred Farrell refers to the song as a musical piece of personal experience. To him, it is like a letter to a friend; he says that we live our lives in fiction, following the belief that everything is okay when it is truly not. According to him, it is now time to put the next generation first and face reality. Additionally, the song refers to the worldwide problem of increasing homelessness on the streets.

To Farrell, “Future” is an anthem for the youth, the planet, and our future.

In the past, Saytr Play have been known for their indie triumph song “Honest Man” and their eclectic live show. For 2020 they have announced 4 live shows so far:

Sunbird Records, Darwen – 28th Feb
Zanzibar – Liverpool – 14th Mar
The Lounge 666 – Archway
London – 28th Mar
Sound City – Liverpool – 2nd May

Altogether, Saytr Play’s new song is truly an anthem made for young people. The band use their voice and speak out for what most of us are too shy or too scared to say. They say it how it is, without any sugar-coating. “Future” is a wakeup call for all of us to rethink our behaviour, reminding us that we should focus our potential toward making the world a better place, not a worse one.

Saytr Play’s debut EP In Truth I Fear for the Heart is out April 24, 2020.



— —

:: pre-order Saytr Play’s debut EP here ::
Stream: “Future” – Saytr Play



— — — —

Future - Saytr Play

Connect to Saytr Play on
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram 
Discover new music on Atwood Magazine
📸 © 2019


:: Today’s Song(s) ::

 follow our daily playlist on Spotify



:: Stream Saytr Play ::

 


Nina Schaarschmidt

Music, fashion, arts and book enthusiast. Big lover of alternative, indie and rock tunes. Restless wanderer lived in several places around the globe on two continents. Appreciator of creative lyrics and storytellers. Based in lovely Manchester, a place full of musical history, creativity and good gigs. You’ll probably find me in the vinyl section somewhere, well dressed with a coffee and a book in my hands.