This Just In: DBMK Celebrate Singularity in “Haunted House”

DBMK’s “Haunted House” illustrates a desire for finding one’s “pack;” somewhere or someone to call home amidst uncertainty.
Stream: “Haunted House” – DBMK




Jump in the Dark - DBMK

DBMK

Shoutout to the weirdos; the outcasts; the wannabe beatniks. Raising up the freak-flag high, proudly, for all to see: these are the ones who remind us that one should always remain unapologetically individualistic. On their newest single “Haunted House,” Nashville-by-way-of-Florida band DBMK shoutout these outsiders, seeking solace in singularity.

The song first opens with the unassuming, yet untrusting, “Are you one of us?“, immediately setting the tone for the song’s overall theme. “Haunted House” then finds DBMK’s lead singer, Kyle Knudsen, crooning about acceptance and hoping desperately to find someone to trust.

Are you one of us?
Show the bruises now
you don’t know who to trust
Do you get enough?
Burn the proof and now
you’re freezing to the touch yeah, yeah



Seeking out this acceptance, Knudsen delineates craving a need to be wanted, or perhaps a want to be needed. Feeling obligatory in fitting in, “Haunted House” simply requests relief from supercilious conventions. The song celebrates the misfits, asking only for reassurance amidst anxiety.

Tell where you’re at and where you’re going
Move a little slower when you-
Tell where you’re at and where you’re going
I move a little slower when you cut me open

Opening oneself up to others is a scary prospect, yet it is something that is integral to our very humanness. “Haunted House” taps into the basic humanity of wanting to feel acknowledged, all the while navigating the terrifying idea of vulnerability. To be vulnerable and to be fallible inherently taps into our intrinsic nature of being.

DBMK have never been shy to wear their heart on their sleeve in their music, showcasing a raw sensitivity that sets them apart. Knudsen’s lyricism and vocals, coupled with drummer Colton Ward’s infectious beats, DBMK have curated a sound that feels wholly complimentary and comprehensible.

DBMK create music for the people, delving deeper into the meaning of it all with exquisite idiosyncrasy.



As “Haunted House” continues into its chorus, Knudsen sings:

I burn through
Glowing in the dark for you
And I’m bleeding but I-
I won’t move
So come and find me
If you want me to burn then ignite me

The final line of the chorus, “If you want me to burn, then ignite me,” feels especially poignant; it serves as an invitation to any doubters to dare try be dubious, offering instead an impunity of confidence deservedly wielded.

The song isn’t entirely free from its paranoia, however, as the second verse denotes:

Are you trying to get alone
Freezing fingers cut the ringer off your phone
Watch your tone
Don’t forget you only know what I have shown you, yeah

DBMK have a particular way of expressing true, callow feeling in their lyricism, allowing listeners to feel especially entranced by the pliancy of their music. DBMK are intrinsic storytellers, borne by an innate desire for honesty and passion. “Haunted House” further proves this sentiment, providing the band with a dualistic opportunity for acceptance by their peers as well as a love of individuality, neither one outweighing the other in its significance.

“Haunted House” illustrates a desire for finding one’s “pack;” somewhere or someone to call home amidst uncertainty. The song delineates the uneasiness felt while enduring all of this, but never once feels hopeless that there is no answer. DBMK and “Haunted House” fully accept and admire the weird, and invite anyone who wish to partake to do so, freely and without any judgment.

 



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Maggie McHale

Maggie is the Chief Music Director for Atwood Magazine, currently living in Philadelphia. She also works as a music manager and cultural liaison via her management company, PBG MGMT. She is heavily involved in the arts and music scene in the City of Brotherly Love, working previously for as a digital marketer for Fame House, a Universal Music Group subsidiary, and as a staff writer for JUMP Magazine. A self-proclaimed “hug enthusiast” and dog lover, Maggie also enjoys fashion, travel, the paranormal, and drinking way too much coffee.