Premiere: The Stunning, Raw Weight of Rothwell’s Poignant “I Wonder If You’re Happy”

I Wonder If You're Happy - Rothwell
Bristol born, London-based singer/songwriter Rothwell erupts with an aching passion in “I Wonder If You’re Happy,” a heavy-hearted reflection on distance, disconnect, and change, and a poignant message to the one who got away.
for fans of Adele, Sia, Frances
Stream: “I Wonder If You’re Happy” – Rothwell




Do you see my face in strangers too?

When Rothwell sings from the heart, it’s almost too much to bear. The young Bristol-born, London-based singer/songwriter is a next-generation Adele, injecting intimate moments with a dynamic vocal intensity that will blow away even the most casual listener. She’s done it before with tracks like “Darling” and “Velvet Heart,” and now it’s happening all over again with a song that comes from the deepest depths of a fractured, mending soul: Rothwell erupts with an aching passion in “I Wonder If You’re Happy,” a heavy-hearted reflection on distance, disconnect, and change, and a poignant message to the one who got away.

I Wonder If You're Happy - Rothwell

I Wonder If You’re Happy – Rothwell

I know it’s been a while now,
We never talk, we’ve got nothing to say,
Saw something in a stranger,
It looked just like you from far away.
I still hope it got better,
I still care,
Something in a stranger
Reminds me of you in every single way

Atwood Magazine is proud to be premiering “I Wonder If You’re Happy,” the latest single of 2020. Having debuted in 2017 and most recently toured with Little Mix just last year, Rothwell has garnered over 20 million global streams thanks to her infectious alt-pop sounds and her tremendous vocal prowess. She’s collaborated as a vocalist with the likes of Jack Wins, Metrik, and other producers before, but it’s her solo material that truly strikes a nerve and showcases her artistry.

Tremendously emotive and expressive, “I Wonder If You’re Happy” highlights everything there is to love about this emerging talent in a bold outpouring of bittersweet sentiment.



“I was sitting on the train to North London headed to a songwriting session when this person got on and sat opposite me,” Rothwell tells Atwood Magazine. “The way they gestured, the way they looked a little bit uncomfortable in their own skin and the way they was dressed reminded me so much of someone who I once thought I loved. It stuck with me, I hadn’t thought about them in such a long time and suddenly it felt like they were sitting right in front of me. All I could think about was how fond of this human I had once been. I wish them well, I hope they’ve found new love and I hope they’re happy. The song wrote itself and I’m so excited to be releasing a song as it was written, just voice and piano. Here is to friends becoming strangers, but remembering people for the good they bought into your life.”

Here is to friends becoming strangers, but remembering people for the good they bought into your life.

Rothwell explodes out in a glorious chorus, capturing the seismic turbulence going on inside as she sings:

I don’t miss you like I did before
Cause I don’t know you like that anymore
We tried hard enough
To pull this whole thing off
All our years were rough
You couldn’t call that shit love
I wonder if you’re happy
I still hate the thought of you being alone
Do you see my face in strangers to?
Wonder where I’ve been?
If I’m on my own?



The artist opts for poignant reverie over bitter remorse and anger; she’s far enough detached from the situation that she can look back fondly once again. Her tone is somber and sad – not because of the ending, but rather because of the distance.

As we grow older, we lose touch with more than just our exes: Close friends and even family members can drift away, if we let them – and the sheer fact of the matter is that we cannot possibly hold on to everybody. In that way, “I Wonder If You’re Happy” is so much more than a song about an ex: It speaks to the disconnect all of us experience in our relationships – all the ones we lose touch with or let split from our grasp.

Rothwell’s voice trembles as she winds her way through the second verse, taking the long route through memory lane as she stumbles through pleasant scenes that exist forever in the past:

You took me to your home town
You walked me down to your favourite place,
I don’t know if you’re there now
But we had to hide from the pouring rain,
I don’t know why I remember,
But I still care
And staring at a stranger
Takes me all the way back to when we were there
I don’t miss you like I did before
But I don’t know you like that anymore
We tried hard enough
To pull this whole thing off
All our years were rough
You couldn’t call that shit love
I wonder if you’re happy
I still hate the thought of you being alone



There’s no denying the promise and potential of this dazzling alt-pop phenomenon.

“I love the way big ballads give so much space to the story they’re telling and the emotions they’re giving across,” Rothwell says. “I love nothing more than walking in the dark with a ballad on full blast in my headphones – it always hits me right in the feels.”

Rothwell’s voice alone is breathtaking; add a little piano to it, and she’s got a powerful ballad capable of shaking awake the coldest of hearts. “I Wonder If You’re Happy” is a true gem of sincerity – a cathartic release ready to accept the past and embrace the moment. Stream Rothwell’s new single exclusively on Atwood Magazine, and dive deeper into this exciting London artist below!

I love the way big ballads give so much space to the story they’re telling and the emotions they’re giving across.

Rothwell © 2020

Rothwell © 2020



MEET ROTHWELL

Atwood Magazine: What other female artists are an influence for you?

Rothwell: I’d say I’m pretty heavily influenced by the old school legends like Julie London, Nina Simone, Billie Holiday. I love the way they portray the emotion of their music simply using their voice. I was obsessed with the Spice Girls as a kid, but then again who wasn’t?

Can you talk more about the circumstances that influenced this song?

Rothwell: I was on my way to the studio for a writing session with the lush Nocturn boys and on my way there I sat opposite this guy on the tube. He had exactly the same mannerisms as someone I used to know and someone I thought I loved. It just got me thinking and wondering where they were now and if they were ever reminded of me by the little things of everyday life.

Do you see my face in strangers too?
Wonder where I’ve been?
If I’m on my own?
They had these eyes
I’ve seen before
The deepest green
They were just like yours
Sitting there
Didn’t have a clue
That they reminded me of you



Do you feel like this is a prime example of the kind of music you're looking to define your artistry and sound?

Rothwell: Absolutely, I feel like this is the most honest I’ve been with the artistry and sound and it’s all been a really natural process. I’ve loved going back to real sounds and feel unapologetically myself in this record.

What is it that attracts you to big, emotive ballads like this?

Rothwell: Gotta love making people cry!!! Nahh, just joking. I just always have, and always will. I love the way big ballads give so much space to the story they’re telling and the emotions they’re giving across. I love nothing more than walking in the dark with a ballad on full blast in my headphones – it always hits me right in the feels (I’m a fun person, I promise…)

What are your goals of 2020?

Rothwell: To sing as much as I can, to write as much as I can and to have a wild ride whilst doing it so I’ve got some good stories to tell. I’m so excited for my upcoming releases and festival shows this summer!

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Stream: “I Wonder If You’re Happy” – Rothwell



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I Wonder If You're Happy - Rothwell

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📸 © 2020

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Mitch Mosk

Mitch is the Editor-in-Chief of Atwood Magazine and a 2014 graduate from Tufts University, where he pursued his passions of music and psychology. He currently works at Universal Music Group in New York City. In his off hours, Mitch may be found songwriting, wandering about one of New York's many neighborhoods, or writing an article on your next favorite artist for Atwood. Mitch's words of wisdom to fellow musicians and music lovers are thus: Keep your eyes open and never stop exploring. No matter where you go, what you do or who you are with, you can always learn something new and inspire something amazing. Say hi here: mitch[at]atwoodmagazine[dot]com