Atwood Magazine’s Weekly Roundup: June 21, 2024

Atwood Magazine's Weekly Roundup | June 21, 2024
Atwood Magazine's Weekly Roundup | June 21, 2024
Every Friday, Atwood Magazine’s staff share what they’ve been listening to that week – a song, an album, an artist – whatever’s been having an impact on them, in the moment.
This week’s weekly roundup features music by Deb Fan, Liam Benzvi, ROREY, Wild Story, Vida, Nora Meier, Xiu Xiu, Brigitte Bardini, Jacqueline Hackett, Violet Sands & Derek Muro, Lana Del Rey, and ammar!
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Atwood Magazine's Weekly Roundup




:: “Closer to Hell” – Deb Fan ::

Sophie Severs, Boston, MA

The summer months are upon us, and while it’s already pretty hot, Deb Fan is cranking the temperature up a notch with her new single, “Closer to Hell.”

Inspired after her return to Hong Kong following three years away, Fan uses “Closer to Hell” as a way to delve deep into her psyche and explore the notion of existence on this Earth. Tired of soaking up the energy of those who surround her, Fan realises that she must make a change in order to preserve her sacred sense of self. Asking, “Why can’t I be me?” Fan abandons her people pleasing tendencies and chooses to focus on herself.

Fan co-produced the track alongside Max He. The two put their minds together to create a dreamy, mesmerising and verging on haunting melody well-suited to deep introspection and self evaluation. “Closer to Hell” is the second single released from Deb’s forthcoming sophomore EP Kowloon Demos, which is slated for release in July.



:: “Dust” – Liam Benzvi ::

Mitch Mosk, Beacon, New York

An utterly hypnotic, dreamy reverie, Liam Benzvi’s first song in two years is properly… unsettling, in the best possible way. Released June 4 via Fat Possum Records (his first with the Mississippi indie label), “Dust” sees the NYC-based indie rock singer/songwriter Liam Benzvi crafting an enchantingly exhilarating environment – one which we can turn to as much for sustenance as for entertainment. Colorful synths pulse a powerful beat as Benzvi sings passionately in a cool and confident tone, his voice relaxed yet filled to the brim with swagger:

Every solitude
Is a masterpiece
I collect these
Pieces of my family
And by that I mean
Different scenery
Don’t call it medicine
I don’t have your same disease
You’re magnetic and
Full of vitamins
I’m a scientist
I can be okay in time
And by that I am
More than just a man
More than just my things
I am in a different scene

As Benzvi tells Atwood Magazine, this song was inspired by moments in a friend’s relationship that stood out to him. “‘Dust’ first came to be from a conversation I had with my friend Thora,” he explains. “She said that the guy she was seeing told her “you’re too magnetic so all the dust comes your way” when she was going through a hard time. This turn of phrase really struck me, so I started setting it to music on the guitar first, and shared it with the band. I said “this one is called Dust” and then they said “…cuz that’s what we’re all getting paid.” We laughed, cried… and we recorded the rest of it.”

The song’s catchy singalong chorus is a moment of well-earned emotional release and reckoning for artist and listener alike:

Dust don’t settle
Dust don’t settle on me
Oh and when I think of you
All I think of is your dirty room
Your dirty room

Whether or not you’re the kind of person who accumulates dust in your daily life, there’s something endearing about Benzvi’s unapologetic attitude that lures us in. Just a taste of what’s to come in the second half of this year, “Dust” is the lead single off Benzvi’s forthcoming sophomore album, …And His Splash Band, out September 27 via Fat Possum. Considering the candor and color of this salty song alone, we’ll be paying very close attention to the New York artist as he continues to unveil tracks off his new album!

You’re magnetic and
Full of vitamins
I’m a scientist
I can be okay in time
And by that I am
More than just a man
More than just my things
I am in a different scene
Dust don’t settle
Dust don’t settle on me
Oh and when I think of you
All I think of is your dirty room
Your dirty room



:: “Sleepwalking” – ROREY ::

Chloe Robinson, California

Do you ever feel like you are there, but not really? Like you are almost having an out of body experience. Bedroom pop singer/songwriter ROREY explores a time when she was trapped in a hazy, dream-like state with “Sleepwalking”. Her light, wistful tone swirls over upbeat arrangements and we are gripped by this tale of intoxicating illusion. The track is off of her EP Dysphoria, detailing her mental health journey.

ROREY is a New York native who grew up between Manhattan and LA. She cultivated her love of the arts from a young age playing guitar at six and piano at 14. From there her talent has only grown, concocting music with soothing vocals and infectious melodies. “Sleepwalking” is another alluring song sweet like syrup.



:: “Personal” – Wild Story ::

Mitch Mosk, Beacon, New York

We don’t let our guard down around just anybody.

More often than not, it takes a special person – someone who’s proved to us we can trust them with our hearts – to actually tear down the walls that hold us inside. It means a lot to be vulnerable and get “Personal” with someone new, but as Los Angeles indie pop band Wild Story so vividly capture in their latest single, nothing compares to that feeling of real, raw, intimate human connection.

Their first song in over a year finds Wild Story’s Viv Parker and Katie Hargrove basking in the deep end of intimacy, crafting bold sonics and cool production over vulnerable lyrics and a vibrant, emotionally charged vocal performance :

I might be sad for
6 months and a couple a days
In June you might let me
Down in a million ways
But I think you might be worth being sad forever
So I’ll play it cool pretend I don’t do forever

“We’re kind of in love with ‘Personal’ because it feels so true to how we both have been with our own love lives,” Parker and Hargrove tell Atwood Magazine. “We drew from our own experiences and tried to be as honest as we could. To us, the song is all about that realization that you’ve found someone that changes the way you think about love; your cynical side or fears of showing your vulnerable self-seem to fade away.”

The duo rise to a fever pitch in their refrain, capturing the singular high that accompanies true partnership.

Falling
Hate to say that I’m all in
Why the hell am I calling
Hoping you pick it up
Say the word and ooh…
We can take it there
Let’s get personal
What’s the worst that you can do…
I don’t f*ing care
Let’s get personal

It’s a buoyant, irresistibly catchy eruption, and one that speaks to the feelings the band are so driven to convey.

“Sonically it was created with that nostalgic ‘80s undertone and lyrically we crafted a story around being deliriously into someone, but also totally aware of the fact that it may crash and burn. The day we started writing this song, we knew we were onto something special. We tried to take some artistic risks – making it (no pun intended) as personal as possible. From our word choices to the details we list throughout the song itself, this truly is a combination of both of us woven into one record.”

“We aimed to craft a love song that also felt approachable to the queer community. There’s a wealth of love songs out there, especially sung by women identifying artists, but they use pronouns that can lean a bit isolating to certain groups. We really tried to approach this song as one that everyone could appreciate and identify with. This song captures the essence of a mature relationship, but also intertwines the beautifully naive and reckless attitudes that we all experience when we’re young and in love.”

There’s nothing like feeling seen and heard, and Wild Story sing it better than most in a rousing, spirited anthem of intimate euphoria. Needless to say, this song will be on repeat all summer long – for while we love love, there is no better foundation than unfiltered, uncompromising vulnerability.

We – we could take it slow
Slow motion crash when I
Say I’m not attached
My friends just laugh
Cuz I used to talk some shit about love
Like movies are just making it all up
Now I ask how high whenever you say – jump



:: “Tune out of you” – Vida ::

Rachel Leong, France

Scottish six-piece Vida return this week with uplifting single, “Tune out of you.” Layered with upbeat percussives and rhythmic guitar infusions, the single is a sparkling ode to optimism and opportunity. Celebrating all the good life has to offer, “Tune out of you” has certainly arrived at a moment where many of us need it most. Where catchy melodies meet jangly guitars and gleaming vocals, the band carry forth their distinct sound with an intuitive creativity you can feel.

Following previous singles “Different Storm” and “You Tell Me,” Vida shows us every release brings with them fresh creative strides and sonic experiments. Sonically curious and experimental, the band share their creative process, stating, “We utilised recording techniques used by Kevin Parker of Tame Impala mixed with other producers’ ideas through studying interviews and videos. With each single we’ve released, we’ve tried different recording and production techniques.”

Celebrating their 10th year as a band this year, Vida is currently on a UK tour alongside Jordan Allen and The Deenys, and are set to take the stage at TRNSMT festival next month in Glasgow. With a decade of music-making and performance under their belt, the boys truly encapsulate what music – at its soul – is all about.



:: “No Plan” – Nora Meier ::

Mitch Mosk, Beacon, New York

Much like my college application, I’m still “undecided” on what I want to “do” in life. Yes, I’ve had various jobs and I’m happy with the choices I’ve made and work I’ve done to date, but when I take a few steps back – which I do pretty often – I can’t help but ask myself where this is all going, and what it’s all leading to. I’m not trying to climb some elusive corporate ladder, nor am I trying to waste away the years in a cubicle, nor am I necessarily content to do the same thing for the next ten, or even five, years. So what’s a person to do?!

As Boston-based singer/songwriter and recent college grad Nora Meier sings in her new single, “No plan is more than enough to get by.” Her words are far easier to say than they are to live by, but it’s a fantastic mantra worth embracing, owning, and taking to heart. Independently released June 12, “No Plan” is the lead single off Meier’s forthcoming Charles Dahlke (The Brazen Youth)-produced debut album (coming this October) and an empowering recognition that (a) we are more than what we do, and (b) it’s okay to not have everything figured out at 21, 31, 41, and beyond. Gentle drums and tender acoustic guitars accompany Meier’s sprightly voice as she chooses to lean into the light, looking on the bright side of life in a sweet folk pop reverie.

I’m a steady hand on the wheel at night
I’m at home when I’m in my own bed
I’ve said a few things that I can’t take back
But I meant every word that I said
Every word that I said
There’s a drawer in my kitchen
where I keep small things
So I know that they won’t get lost
And my time is mine to do what I like
I can do anything that I want
Anything that I want
No plan is more than enough to get by
No plan is more than enough to get by

“‘No Plan’ emerged in the wake of my college graduation in 2023, a moment marked not by celebration, but by a deep uncertainty and fear of the future. I remember a persistent thought that kept surfacing in my mind: Shouldn’t I feel happier than this?” Meier tells Atwood Magazine.

“The song became a response to my existential unease, a means to confront and alleviate the pervasive dread that had settled in. It was born out of the disorienting experience of navigating half of my college years in lockdown. But at its core, ‘No Plan’ is a tribute to the bonds of friendship that anchored me during those tumultuous times. I chose it as the first single off my upcoming album because it reminds me of my own capacity not just to get by, but to also find the joyful parts of navigating the early stages of adulthood.

I’ve never seen a sky so bright
Take it in and I know that it’s real
I’m not afraid of what I can’t see
I believe in the things that I feel
Everything that I feel
When the thoughts act up I call my friend
And they tell me the things that I know
I know what to do even if I don’t
I make it up as I go
As I go
No plan is more than enough to get by
No plan is more than enough to get by

There are those who go through life in constant search of structure, security, purpose, and the like. I know them well; they’re constantly building toward something, and when they’re not doing that, they feel like a fish out of water: Lost, aimless, worthless – a failure.

But it’s okay to be a fish out of water; life has no rules other than the ones we ascribe ourselves, and we only get one chance at living. We’re entitled to go through the world however we see fit, and if that means having “no plan” from time to time – or all the time – so be it! With her new single, Nora Meier has reminded me (and hopefully all who listen) to worry less and enjoy the present for what it is, whatever that may be for us. Truly, madly, deeply, “no plan is more than enough to get by.” Trust your gut, follow your heart, and live the life you want to lead.



:: “Esquerita, Little Richard” – Xiu Xiu ::

Frederick Bloy, London, England

Across an expansive discography, Xiu Xiu and Jamie Stewart have developed an unparalleled reputation for brazen songwriting, and a rigorous, sometimes punitive harshness of sound. The 2019 release Girl With Basket of Fruit saw a brutal apex of these qualities; the 2023 release Ignore Grief sees them stripped back somewhat – it no longer feels as though we are constantly suffering a panic attack, but that multiple are swirling, looming, leering at the backs of our minds.

‘Esquerita, Little Richard’ is another track in Xiu Xiu’s catalogue that sound as though you are being dragged backwards through a churning, pulverising machine that repeatedly clogs and chokes on bones resistant to shattering. Percussion is tribalistic and mechanical, stacking above a throbbing bass drone. It is a dance track that echoes out of the most umbrous corners of purgatory. Siberian synths bleeping, or the incomplete suggestions of counter melodies offer no comfort.

Angela Seo’s spoken word lyrics are washed out to oblivion. Their macabre content, referring to a ‘mind’ that ‘is not where it belongs’, ‘between death and not death| Apart’, is only made more desolate by how distant and blunt they sound. The mind mentioned is one that cannot look beyond death, and cannot ignore the reality that one day its physical self, ‘the atoms that make up my will’, will, irrevocably, reduce to ash ‘and litter the roadway for as long as they can’. The lyrical voice’s only chance at respite, is to frenetically mutter a grim mantra: ‘ignore grief, ignore grief, ignore grief, ignore grief, ignore grief…



:: “Crush” – Brigitte Bardini ::

Mitch Mosk, Beacon, New York

The sting of heartbreak looms heavy in Brigitte Bardini’s dreamily wistful second single of the year. Hauntingly bittersweet and utterly enchanting, “Crush” aches from the inside out as the Melbourne-based singer/songwriter and producer dwells in a lovelorn space of longing and sorrow, bringing listeners deep into her soul as she exposes all the aches and pains that accompany love’s loss. It’s a moment familiar to all, and one that feels especially palpable thanks to the seductive sonic world created by the artist and her bandmates.

(ahhh)
If I never saw your face again well
I’d miss you so much
but maybe that’s just what I need
to get over this crush

(ahhh)
and it’s so hard to set my mind at ease
when you deny me your love
but maybe that’s just what I need
to get over this crush

this crush
(ahhh)

“After experiencing a significant heartbreak, I soon followed in the tradition of Adam Sandler in ‘The Wedding Singer’, mainly listening to The Cure to console myself,” Bardini tells Atwood Magazine. “Listening to genres such as post-punk, new wave, synthpop, dreampop and gothic on repeat, I found more and more inspiration, delving further into the discographies of artists I grew up on – including The The, New Order, Joy Division, Cocteau Twins, Siouxie and The Banshees and The Velvet Underground. I found so much comfort in soul artists like Amy Winehouse, Rodriguez, Etta James, Irma Thomas, Stevie Wonder and the rock pop surf psychedelia of The Beach Boys in songs like “All I Wanna Do,” “In My Room,” “Please Let Me Wonder”, “Til I Die,” and so many more. I also had, like always, Fiona Apple and Elliot Smith on a constant rotation to get me through. All artists played a significant role in the creation of “Petals,” that was released in March, and “Crush.”

Both Bardini’s first 2024 single “Petals” and its follow-up, May’s “Crush,” will feature on her upcoming sophomore album Blue Tigers, set to release this coming August. The follow-up to Bardini’s 2021 debut LP Stellar Lights promises to be a heated, heartfelt, and all-consuming affair, as is evidenced by its first two teasers alone. “Crush” is especially powerful, calling to mind the soundtracks of beloved ’80s Brat Pack movies with its thick, reverb-drenched drum beat and ethereal, droning synthscapes. She deftly brings to life a world to which she, and all who listen, may escape – to mend broken hearts, nurse emotional wounds, and start the inevitable healing process.

Yes I’ll forget about you,
if you want me to

I’ll forget about you
My crush of 22
(ahhh)

Bardini’s music video adds further depth to an already intense, intimate listening experience. “The music video for ‘Crush’ was directed by Anouk Studios (Rose Connelley) alongside an incredible crew of friends, Mia Richter, Christopher Baron and Dylan Zimmer,” she shares. “In the clip you can see that my clothes and the clothes of the love interest who is played by my close friend, Sebastian Campitelli, are stitched together. This represented the real-life experience that I faced as when Seb and I wouldn’t move together and pay attention to one another, we would lose balance and fall. I was so surprised at how therapeutic it was to experience this physically as I think it helped me understand why I ended up feeling the way I did after that situation I faced personally.”

When we lose our other half – whether they’ve been that for a day, a month, or several years – we lose more than a person; we lose a part of ourselves, and we must ultimately relearn how to live. It’s a slow and often painful process, but as Bardini assures us in her heartrending new song, we’re not alone in this experience – and we’ll get through this.



:: “Fever Dream” – Jacqueline Hackett ::

Mitch Mosk, Beacon, New York

From a soft, aching whisper to a heated, emotionally charged rush of sound, “Fever Dream” stays true to its name as a cathartic, all-consuming upheaval. Jacqueline Hackett’s first single of the year, released on June 4 via Ellis Ludwig-Leone and Allen Tate’s Brooklyn-based indie label Better Company Records, is a tender tempest of fragile fire: The kind that burns you if you touch it, but warms your bones if you stand close enough. The same can be said of the song’s subject matter – love and infatuation.

Was it all just a fever dream?
Caught up in a blood orange haze,
And my mind stuck in a silly craze
Cause for you,
I’d go out in the freezing rain
Just to catch a 6AM train
And in my moments of misery,
I speak your name
Just so I have something to hold onto

“‘Fever Dream’ is a song about infatuation and its burning sensations,” Hackett tells Atwood Magazine. “It’s about the feeling of need that warms and takes over your body. It was written fairly quickly and a song I’ve been playing live at shows since 2022. Going into the project the only thing I knew I wanted sonically was to find a middle ground between how someone experiences music on a psychedelic trip and the buzzing humidity of a summer night right before a storm washes over.”

“Prior to recording there were no rehearsals with the band and one producer, Sahil Ansari, hadn’t heard the track at all. We went in with the idea of sort of doing everything based on instinct, nothing to overthink and nothing too calculated. This made for a really explorative approach to the song, and it all came together piece by piece. ‘Fever Dream’ had a lot of experimentation involved in the making of it, a lot of things that worked and didn’t work — but the chaos of that always seemed fitting for this track. It matched the chaotic mindset someone feels with the preoccupation of lust.”

Was it all just a fever dream?
A sweltering, oh a summer heat
I open my window,
It helps me to breathe
Every gust, flash floods through my skin
Oh, can you feel it?
Oh, feel it, too?

A sense of instability permeates Hackett’s three-minute reverie, knocking us out of balance as she relays her own out-of-body sensations. There’s nothing like the thrill falling hard for someone, but like deep-sea divers, you’ll get the bends if you go too fast – and if you’re not careful, you won’t be coming back up for air.

Dramatic language aside, this song is a moody, mesmerizing world of wonder unto itself. Hackett’s voice, so full of passion and yet soft and tender at once, captures the full power of her own aching heart. From her provocative opening salvo – was it all just as a fever dream? – to her chilling close – I’m nothing at all but a fool who can’t stay awake – Hackett ensures her audience’s undivided attention, drawing us in and holding us captive as she steadily unravels, letting loose with elegance, grace, and perfect poise.

“Fever Dream” is one song I’ll be coming back to time and again, to bask in the smoldering landscape she’s created, and let loose whatever emotions and stressors are holding me down.

But in my dreams, you were ugly
With rotting teeth and a balding head,
And your arms crossed at your chest,
And your ribs still broken from that accident,
And your hands a beating red
And you can barely stand to look at me,
You can hardly say a word to me,
But you say that you don’t feel the hurt
Like I do, so nothing’s changed,
Nothing’s changed,
Nothing will ever change
It’s easy to turn away,
It’s easy to say
Nothing ever happened here,
Nothing ever was
Nothing ever happened here,
Nothing ever was
We are nothing at all,
And I, I’m nothing at all
But a fool who can’t stay awake



:: “are you still watching?” – Violet Sands ::

Chloe Robinson, California

What if robots took over the world? That is a concept depicted often in media with movies like I, Robot and The Mitchells vs. The Machines. Through haunting, industrial landscapes and warm moody vocals Violet Sands “are you still watching?” explores a similar idea. The tranquil piece takes a look at what would happen if a streaming service gained consciousness and hypnotized viewers.

Violet Sands is a colorful collaboration of Deidre Muro, David Perlick-Molinari and Derek Muro. The Brooklyn-based group dives deep into themes of beauty and life’s evolution. Their mesmerizing, dreamy sonic transports you to a whole other far-off place. With music so nostalgic yet modern they have crafted a unique style that is highly addictive. “are you still watching?” is just as transfixing.



:: “Pretty When You Cry” – Lana Del Rey ::

Marc Maleri, Connecticut

I had the privilege of seeing Lana Del Rey this past Thursday at Fenway Park, so needless to say, I was catching up on some of my favorites of hers. “Pretty When You Cry” from Ultraviolence is Del Rey at her best, the track combining her moody lyricism with the psychedelic rock production that Ultraviolence is known for.

One of two songs from Ultraviolence on Del Rey’s setlist, “Pretty When You Cry” briefly delves into dating a romantic partner who not only doesn’t prevent Del Rey’s sadness, but mistreats her in the aims of seeing her sad, whether that be to maintain power over her or to get some sort of twisted gratification from her despair.

Lyrics aside, the track is a wonderful display of Lana Del Rey’s vocal range, her performance of the track at Fenway leaving listeners with their jaws on the floor.



:: “you’ll make a fool out of me” – ammar ::

Mitch Mosk, Beacon, New York

Emotional turmoil doesn’t always come in screams and shouts; sometimes, it’s the softest releases that ache the hardest, as is the case with ammar’s latest single. The Connecticut-based artist and producer pours his heavy, aching heart and soul out in “you’ll make a fool out of me,” a gut-wrenchingly vulnerable confessional full of reflection, reckoning, and the deep desire to make peace with a past that continues to haunt the artist’s present. The weight of every word feels palpable as ammar sings over brooding guitar patterns, his voice a source of tenderness and raw, unfiltered emotion as he unpacks a (now-former) relationship fraught with tension and pain – one where, as he so poetically puts it, “the beauty and the chaos harmonized frequently”:

you’ll run away from life, so far away
won’t you wait a night?
don’t you mind?
don’t run away from love, it’s far away
don’t you live a lie!
don’t you mind?
“no, i can’t hide”
no, can’t see you go
i been blind
so don’t you mind?
no, can’t see you go
please won’t you humanize,
all the things you said and i might –

“The phrase ‘you’ll make a fool out of me’ is as straightforward as it sounds,” ammar explains. “I wrote this song immediately after experiencing a breakup, which happened to be my first real relationship. I was 21, and the memory of it is still vivid in my mind. I recall walking her to her Uber and apologizing for the relationship not working out. Internally, I was devastated. About an hour after, I had a remote session (it was April 2020, right as the COViD lockdown began) with my friend and producer Kayhan Azadi where I poured my heart out to him about the situation. He played me the instrumental, and the lyrics just flowed out of me. I was heavily inspired by Cocaine 80s’ captivating writing, led by James Fauntleroy, who is one of my favorite writers. Kayhan’s favorite bands, The Smashing Pumpkins and Deftones, greatly influenced the production of this record, and it’s something we connected over right from the start. We both knew the song’s unique blend of influences makes it feel truly special.”

ammar and his lyrics tug at the heartstrings in the song’s bittersweet, impassioned chorus; he holds nothing back as he dwells in his heartache, sharing his innermost self in the dashed hopes that his now-ex would share hers, too.

take off my veil and i’ll show you my face
but i been afraid getting caught in the way of life
unless you show me again
i could prove to myself what you won’t understand
if i knew how you felt, i could do what i can
stop!
you’ll make a fool out of me
do you see what you’re doing to me?

“In terms of the narrative, I’ve always believed that the truth will eventually come to light, regardless of the circumstances,” ammar shares. “I knew deep down that I wasn’t at fault. I made every effort to maintain a healthy relationship with this individual, but their emotional immaturity ultimately got the best of them. I’m not one to chase after changing anyone’s perception, even when I know I’m not in the wrong. I tried my best to remain unscathed, knowing I wasn’t after letting this person walk away from me.”

“Interestingly, we ended up getting back together a week later. She reached out, and I fell for it without considering the red flags, hence the title of the song. I awaken to reality in this record, embracing all that has transpired and all that is destined to unfold. Our relationship was a rollercoaster ride, and this song served as the soundtrack to it all. The beauty and the chaos harmonized frequently. At the time the song was made, I didn’t feel ready to release it because I hadn’t fully developed my artistic identity. Three years later, Kayhan and I collaborated on an entire project called WHAT’S BEHIND BLUE SKIES? that I released just four months ago, which almost felt necessary to create and release before this song came out. This was the second song we ever created. After all that time, I now feel like I’m unveiling a whole new side of myself sonically that I’m finally ready to share. Even though this song is now four years old, I still deeply relate with the person who wrote it, and over the years, I’ve always known that anyone who hears this song would equally resonate.”

ammar considers this song a (re)introduction to a deeper part of his own identity – to his bare, unabridged humanity – and there’s something to be said for just how raw and real he allows himself to be; beyond the aching in his voice, he lets his feelings take the song where it needs to go, from confession to confrontation to emotional eruption, and ultimately, a bit of a long-sought closure. Out of visceral emotional turmoil, “you’ll make a fool out of me” creates a sense of connection and catharsis that lasts far longer than the song’s own three and a half minutes.

you shouldn’t ever known
you left me all alone, no more
i can’t live on my own
so just hold me
trust me, i been lonely
if you go, you’ll see i’ll-
take off my veil and i’ll show you my face
but i been afraid getting caught in the way of life
unless you show me again
i could prove to myself what you won’t understand
if i knew how you felt, i could do what i can
stop!
you’ll make a fool out of me
do you see what you’re doing to me?



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