Premiere: Speaker Face’s “Phosphorescence” Is an Ambient & Organic Immersion

Speaker Face (L-R): Trent Freeman, Ruby Randall, Eric Wright © Jen Squires
A vibrant dedication built on ambient, organic, and pulsing instrumentation, Speaker Face’s “Phosphorescence” off new album ‘Crescent’ glows as a nuanced love song for British Columbia, its first nations, and more.
Stream: “Phosphorescence” – Speaker Face




Each of us finds our own way to give back to the lives we’ve been given: In words, actions, donations, children, and sometimes simply by living our best possible lives, as individuals we all try, throughout our lives, to dedicate a small part of ourselves to (and carry on the memories of) those who came before. For Toronto band Speaker Face, giving back comes in the form of song: A vibrant dedication built on ambient, organic, and pulsing instrumentation, “Phosphorescence” glows as a nuanced love song for British Columbia, its first nations, and more.

Phosphorescence - Speaker Face

Phosphorescence – Speaker Face

Phosphorescence dance ‘round my cold feet
I wave my hand through a sea of light
Sirens sing to the moon as they dance nude
And pull me in with a touch of skin
Would you come for dinner now
Would you come for dinner now
With a stranger in mind
Stranger in mind
Would you come for dinner now
Would you come for dinner now
With a stranger in mind

Atwood Magazine is proud to be premiering “Phosphorescence,” the lead single off Speaker Face’s upcoming sophomore album Crescent (out October 9th, 2020). A Canadian trio well versed in both acoustic and electronic instrumentation, Speaker Face brings together the talents of Trent Freeman and Eric Wright (of JUNO award winning band The Fretless) and stunning vocalist Ruby Randall, whose voice elevates each of the group’s new works to ever-greater heights.



The group’s first work since 2016’s debut album Driftwood, “Phosphorescence” sounds like a brand new chapter for Speaker Face – if not a brand new identity for the band. Its tactile sounds are subtler and richer than its more electro-focused predecessor; it’s easy to hear the artists’ growth toward a new sonic balance, as well as their fuller embrace of acoustic instrumentation in a multimodal context. In its 5 1/2 minute run, “Phosphorescence” ebbs and flows through compelling harmonies, individual instrumental swells, and an unapologetic utilization of space. Speaker Face let the track go where it wants to go; it’s as if the song wrote itself, and they’re merely messengers guiding it along the way.

“‘Phosphorescence’ is a complicated love song for the west coast of British Columbia,” the band explain. “While we feel so welcomed by the land and connected to the nature where Trent grew up, many people were displaced to allow our presence. ‘Phosphorescence’ is a thank you letter to those who were here long before us, specifically the Malchosen and the K’omoks first nations, and the early 1900s Japanese settlers, who were interned during WWII. We hope to see this beautiful place through their eyes.”

They continue, “Trent and Eric produce all the tracks Speaker Face has made. This was recorded at our home studio in Toronto. We love all the tactile hammer sounds of the Rhodes and the fingers plucking the violin; we wanted to have them present and tickling the ears. Capturing the violin part as a cascade of drips helped paint the west coast landscape. Ruby’s voice was recorded three different times in unison and mixed all around your head, so it feels like you’re swimming in the ocean of her voice.”

Speaker Face (L-R): Eric Wright, Ruby Randall, Trent Freeman © Jen Squires

Speaker Face (L-R): Eric Wright, Ruby Randall, Trent Freeman © Jen Squires



It’s easy to get lost in the intimate waves of Speaker Face’s lush sound: They cultivate a strong hypnotizing presence that arrests the senses, tickling the ears while reaching out to each of us on a far more visceral level. They describe their sound as “the feeling of a twilight festival stage and a summer swim,” hoping listeners resonate with the richness of their tones and their beat’s natural qualities.

“The mood of this track is inviting,” they explain. “It’s welcoming and warm but is also going to take you on a journey. Trying to paint the scenery of the West Coast in a sonic landscape.”

One need not be familiar with British Columbia to appreciate the sheer beauty and intent of this song. Between the sweetness of its strings and the nuance of its atmospheric production, “Phosphorescence” swallows our attention – engulfing listeners in a world that feels woodsy and of this plane. Randall’s sterling vocals stun with precision and grace, luring us deeper into a maze that beckons us forth with the promise of safety and sanctuary. It’s a world Speaker Face built, and now it belongs to all of us.

Stream “Phosphorescence” exclusively on Atwood Magazine.

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Stream: “Phosphorescence” – Speaker Face



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Phosphorescence - Speaker Face

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Mitch Mosk

Mitch is the Editor-in-Chief of Atwood Magazine and a 2014 graduate from Tufts University, where he pursued his passions of music and psychology. He currently works at Universal Music Group in New York City. In his off hours, Mitch may be found songwriting, wandering about one of New York's many neighborhoods, or writing an article on your next favorite artist for Atwood. Mitch's words of wisdom to fellow musicians and music lovers are thus: Keep your eyes open and never stop exploring. No matter where you go, what you do or who you are with, you can always learn something new and inspire something amazing. Say hi here: mitch[at]atwoodmagazine[dot]com